Caring For Your Marble: 3 Of The Worst Stains to Avoid

Marble is one of the most popular construction materials due to it’s timeless look and durability. It has been used to build everything from famous landmarks to renowned sculptures including the Parthenon marbles, Aphrodite of Milos, and the Taj Mahal.

Today, it is a common material used in homes. However, as a natural metamorphic stone it is vulnerable to stains. Depending on your habits, marble can stain easily and in some cases, your typical marble cleaning solution won’t be able to get rid of tough stains. In this post, we highlight 3 of the worst marble stains to clean, and how to address them if they happen.

1. Rust Stains

As one of the most difficult to remove marble stains, rust stains are copper to brown in color and occur when metal objects oxidize. The most common culprit of rust stains is metallic objects left to sit on the marble surface for long periods of time. Things like nails, bolts, cans, screws, metal furniture, and metal flower pots can all cause rust stains.

Not only are rust stains unsightly, they’re difficult to remove. If you try to use your regular cleaner to remove the rust stain, it may not be effective because it doesn’t contain the active ingredients that help to remove rust. The most common marble cleaner most homeowners may opt to use is an acidic marble cleaner. However, this type of cleaning solution is not recommended because it can make the problem worse. To remove the rust stains, you may have to call a professional marble restoration technician.

2. Water Stains

Unlike many other stains, water stains cannot be cleaned. Water spots or stains are a result of deposits in water that build up on your marble surfaces over time. This is more common in areas like South Florida where the water contains large amounts of mineral deposits like magnesium and calcium, also known as hard water.

To clean the water spots, the Marble Institute of America recommends the use of 0000 Steel wool. A word of caution- steel wool can be extremely abrasive and should be used with a light touch. If you’d rather not risk further damage to your marble surfaces, it’s best to hire an expert.

3. Biological Stains

Biological growth like algae, lichens, moss, and fungi is common on marble surfaces that are outdoors- especially walls and flooring. When the biological growth is present on your marble surfaces, it will attracts moisture to the surface and retains it there causing discoloration- along with other issues.

To remove the biological growth build-up, experts recommend the use of rainwater.  Why rainwater? It contains fewer mineral deposits compared to tap water. Before cleaning, prepare a mixture of rainwater with non-ionic soap and add this to a sprayer to begin cleaning. When brushing your marble, remember to use a soft bristled brush and orbit motion. Rinse with rainwater and check the results. If the problem persists or if your marble surface still looks dull or discolored, consult a professional.

How to Avoid Marble Stains

When it comes to marble stains, there are a few measures you can take to avoid staining your marble. Remember to use coasters for any drinks placed on your marble counters, and be mindful when using sinks and showers. Try to avoid having metal objects stay in one place for an extended period of time.

While durable, marble surfaces do require some level of extra caution- so make sure you’re treating your marble carefully. Are you in search of professionals who can restore the reflective finish on your marble surfaces? At Classic Marble Restoration, we can help. Contact us today for your free consultation.

Devin VanceCaring For Your Marble: 3 Of The Worst Stains to Avoid

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